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Sunday, February 19, 2017

The Singles Game (Lauren Weisberger)

When Charlotte 'Charlie' Silver makes a pact with the devil, infamously brutal tennis coach Todd Feltner, she finds herself catapulted into a world of stylists, private parties, and secret dates with Hollywood royalty.
Under Todd, it is no more good-girl attitude: he wants warrior princess Charlie all the way. After all, no one ever won by being nice.
Celebrity mags and gossip blogs go wild for Charlie, chasing scandal as she jets around the globe. But as the warrior princess' star rises, both on and off the court, it comes at a high price. Is the real Charlie Silver still inside?

Quote: "From here on out we'll be working on a mental makeover, if you will. I want aggressive. Go-getting. Intimidation. You think the men are walking around apologising for everything and hugging each other? Hell, no! And the girls shouldn't be either."

My thoughts on this book: I am not a particular fan of this story, to tell you the truth.
Let us start with the good parts: you learn a lot about the pro tennis circuit. Lauren Weisberger clearly did her research because she shows you all the particulars of travelling, uniforms, practice schedules, nutrition, and the like. You learn about the image manipulation, the press, and the dance of romance. This part is pretty interesting.
Now, about Charlie: she is not dull. She is just unoriginal. There is little to her that you have not read elsewhere. She has above average tennis skills, good enough to be on tour but not excellent enough to win a grand slam. Everyone in her life keeps telling her to just quit. And Weisberger limits the perspective of the book to Charlie's, so you really only know what Charlie thinks and what motivates her. What about her father, her brother, her (former) coach? What drives these people throughout the story?
One person who is quite happy to have Charlie compete is her new coach, who is straight out of Central Casting for 'Overbearing Brute'. Again, this is a character you have seen before in dozens and dozens of books. And so is the Hot Mediterranean Lover. In a cast of utterly unoriginal characters, Marco surely is the worst. He says and does absolutely nothing that distinguishes him from the others.
I will say this much: I did want to find out what happened. I wanted to know when, exactly, would Charlie grow up and what she would do after tennis was over.
The worst part of all had to be the ending. After dragging out the various dramas at play, the ending occurs so quickly that I was left wondering whether Weisberger had been held to a word count. What was that all about?

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